Advertisement

Effect of Medullary Lesions on Scrotal Thermoregulation: A Preliminary Study

  • S. Belhamou
  • A. Chapuis
  • R. Hsiung
  • A. Clavert
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 286)

Abstract

Hyperthermia is an important factor of infertility as it has been demonstrated by Zorgniotti (1973) and Mieusset (1987). The low testicular temperature is regulated by numerous regulatory systems (Setchell, 1978), which are neurologically mediated. Iggo (1969) described cutaneous thermoreceptors in the scrotal skin. Kumazawa and Mizumura (1983) demonstrated a thermal dependency of chemical response of the superior spermatic nerve in vitro. In rats, scrotal temperature induces neurological responses in thalamus, hypothalamus (Kanosue et al., 1985) and caudate-putamen (Taylor et al., 1987). The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of spinal injury on scrotal temperature in men.

Keywords

Spinal Injury Local Heating Chemical Response Scrotal Skin Scrotal Temperature 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Brindley, G.S. 1982. Deep scrotal temperature and the effect on it of clothing, air temperature, activity, posture and paraplegia,Brit. J. Urol., 54:49–56.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Hsiung, R.,Bothorel, B., Dewasmes, G., Candas, V. and Clavert, A. 1990. Effect of local heating on scrotal temperature, in: Temperature and other environmental factors on the testis, A.W. Zorgniotti, ed., Plenum, New York.Google Scholar
  3. Hsiung, R., Nieva, H. and Clavert, A. 1990. Scrotal hyperthermia and varicocele, in: Temperature and other environmental factors on the testis, A.W. Zorgniotti, ed., Plenum, New York.Google Scholar
  4. Iggo, A. 1969. Cutaneous thermoreceptors in primates and subprimates,J. Physio l., 200:403–430.Google Scholar
  5. Kanosue, K., Nakayama, T., Ishikawa, Y., Hosono, T., Kaminaga, T. and Shosaku, A. 1985. Response of thalamic and hypothalamic neurones to scrotal warming in rats: non-specific responses?Brain Res., 328:207–213.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Kumazawa, T. and Mizumura, K. 1983. Temperature dependency of the chemical response of the polymodal receptor units in vitro,Brain Res., 278:305–307.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Mieusset, R., Bujan, I., Mondinat, C., Mansat, A., Pontonnier, F. and Grandjean, H. 1987. Association of scrotal hyperthermia with impaired spermatogenesis in infertile men,Fertil. Steril., 48:1006–1011.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  8. Taylor, D.C.M., Steele, J.E. and Gayton, R.J. 1987. An analysis of the responses of rat striatal neurones to scrotal skin temperature,Brain Res., 419:352–356.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. Zorgniotti, A.W. and MacLeod, J. 1973. Studies in temperature, human semen quality and varicocele,Fertil. Steril., 24:854–863.PubMedGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • S. Belhamou
    • 1
  • A. Chapuis
    • 2
  • R. Hsiung
    • 3
  • A. Clavert
    • 3
  1. 1.Service d’urologieCentre Hospitalier GeneralMulhouse CedexFrance
  2. 2.Centre de Réadaptation FonctionnelleMulhouse CedexFrance
  3. 3.CECOS of AlsaceStrasbourg CedexFrance

Personalised recommendations