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Chemical Kinetic Investigations of the Channel-Opening Process of Neurotransmitter Receptors

  • Norio Matsubara
  • Andrew P. Billington
  • Hou Chang Chen
  • Anthony P. Guzikowski
  • Katherine W. Johnson
  • Doraiswamy Ramesh
  • Melody T. Sweet
  • George P. Hess
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 287)

Abstract

The application of chemical kinetic investigations, using fast reaction techniques, to the studies of neuronal receptor-mediated reactions has been recently reported (Hess et al., 1979, 1987). However, the use of such mixing techniques is limited to the studies of receptors in membrane vesicles (Hess et al., 1979) with a time resolution of 5 msec, or to measurements with receptor-containing cells (Udgaonkar and Hess, 1987) with a 20 msec time resolution. In order to clarify the activation process of receptors, a new method which has a faster time resolution must be developed. Caged compounds pioneered by Professor Jack Kaplan, University of Pennsylvania, and Professor David Trentham, National Institute for Medical Research, London, are good candidates for this purpose. In contrast to their oxygen-bonded caged compounds, we protected nitrogen atoms included in many neurotransmitters. We have synthesized caged neurotransmitters bonded to a photo-dissociative o-nitrobenzyl group with the nitrogen atom. These compounds have shown relatively fast photolysis and have been useful for the study of neuronal receptors.

Keywords

Acetylcholine Receptor Flash Photolysis Laser Flash Photolysis Photolysis Rate Cage Compound 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • Norio Matsubara
    • 1
  • Andrew P. Billington
    • 1
  • Hou Chang Chen
    • 1
  • Anthony P. Guzikowski
    • 1
  • Katherine W. Johnson
    • 1
  • Doraiswamy Ramesh
    • 1
  • Melody T. Sweet
    • 1
  • George P. Hess
    • 1
  1. 1.Section of Biochemistry, Molecular and Cell Biology, 217 Biotechnology BuildingCornell UniversityIthacaUSA

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