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Structural, Developmental and Functional Heterogeneity of Rat GABAA Receptors

  • Allan J. Tobin
  • Michel Khrestchatisky
  • A. John MacLennan
  • Ming-Yi Chiang
  • Niranjala J. K. Tillakaratne
  • Wentao Xu
  • Meyer B. Jackson
  • Nicholas Brecha
  • Catia Sternini
  • Richard W. Olsen
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 287)

Abstract

My laboratory has had a long interest in multigene families, starting with our earlier work on the developmental regulation of hemoglobin switching. I have especially been impressed both by the number of multigene families in the vertebrate genome and by their widespread developmental regulation, as exemplified by switching within the globin gene families. Even the lamprey, whose adult hemoglobin, unlike those of higher vertebrates, contains only one type of globin chain, has different forms in its larval and adult stages.

Keywords

Olfactory Bulb Multigene Family Granule Cell Layer Glutamate Decarboxylase Olfactory Tubercle 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • Allan J. Tobin
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Michel Khrestchatisky
    • 1
  • A. John MacLennan
    • 1
  • Ming-Yi Chiang
    • 1
  • Niranjala J. K. Tillakaratne
    • 1
  • Wentao Xu
    • 1
  • Meyer B. Jackson
    • 1
    • 2
  • Nicholas Brecha
    • 2
    • 4
    • 7
  • Catia Sternini
    • 5
    • 7
  • Richard W. Olsen
    • 2
    • 6
  1. 1.Department of BiologyUniversity of CaliforniaLos AngelesUSA
  2. 2.Brain Research InstituteUniversity of CaliforniaLos AngelesUSA
  3. 3.Molecular Biology InstituteUniversity of CaliforniaLos AngelesUSA
  4. 4.Department of AnatomyUniversity of CaliforniaLos AngelesUSA
  5. 5.Department of MedicineUniversity of CaliforniaLos AngelesUSA
  6. 6.Department of PharmacologyUniversity of CaliforniaLos AngelesUSA
  7. 7.Center for Ulcer ResearchVeterans Administration Medical CenterLos AngelesUSA

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