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What Factors Regulate the Action of Lipoprotein Lipase?

  • Thomas Olivecrona
  • Gunilla Bengtsson-Olivecrona
  • Magnus Hultin
  • Jonas Peterson
  • Senén Vilaró
  • Richard J. Deckelbaum
  • Yvon A. Carpentier
  • Josef Patsch
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 285)

Abstract

Triglyceride transport is an efficient process. Meals containing as much as 100 g triglycerides are usually absorbed and disposed within a few hours with only a moderate rise in the plasma triglyceride concentration.1 Most of the lipoprotein triglycerides are unloaded through hydrolysis by lipoprotein lipase at endothelial sites in extra-hepatic tissues.2 It is often stated that this step is rate-limiting for triglyceride transport, and that it directs the tissue distribution of lipid uptake.3 Inherent in this concept are two assumptions that we will discuss in this paper.

Keywords

Lipoprotein Lipase Plasma Triglyceride Concentration Lipoprotein Triglyceride Avid Uptake Fatty Acid Control 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Thomas Olivecrona
    • 1
  • Gunilla Bengtsson-Olivecrona
    • 1
  • Magnus Hultin
    • 1
  • Jonas Peterson
    • 1
  • Senén Vilaró
    • 2
  • Richard J. Deckelbaum
    • 3
  • Yvon A. Carpentier
    • 4
  • Josef Patsch
    • 5
  1. 1.Medical Biochemistry and BiophysicsUniversity of UmeåSweden
  2. 2.Cell BiologyUniversity of BarcelonaSpain
  3. 3.Pediatric GastroenterologyColumbia UniversityNew YorkUSA
  4. 4.Clinical NutritionFree University of BrusselsBelgium
  5. 5.MedicineUniversity of InnsbruckAustria

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