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Kinetic Studies of the Origin of Apolipoprotein (APO) B-100 in Low Density Lipoproteins of Normal and Watanabe Heritable Hyperlipidemic (WHHL) Rabbits

  • Richard J. Havel
  • David M. Shames
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 285)

Abstract

Numerous studies in humans, as well as in experimental animals, support the general conclusion that low density lipoproteins (1.02 <d<1.06 g/ml; LDL) are a product of the metabolism of hepatogenous triglyceride-rich precursor particles of lower density, mainly by the action of lipolytic enzymes (lipoprotein lipase and, perhaps, hepatic lipase) on component triglycerides and phospholipids (1). From kinetic studies in humans, the concept has developed that this process occurs progressively, by conversion of large very low density lipoproteins (VLDL) to lipoproteins of progressively higher density in a lipolytic cascade (2).

Keywords

Cholesteryl Ester Density Gradient Ultracentrifugation Extravascular Compartment Multicompartmental Model Intravascular Compartment 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Richard J. Havel
    • 1
  • David M. Shames
    • 1
  1. 1.Cardiovascular Research Institute and Department of MedicineUniversity of CaliforniaSan FranciscoUSA

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