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Distribution of Dimeric Dihydrodiol Dehydrogenase in Pig Tissues and its Role in Carbonyl Metabolism

  • Toshihiro Nakayama
  • Hideo Sawada
  • Yoshihiro Deyashiki
  • Takushi Kanazu
  • Akira Hara
  • Michio Shinoda
  • Kazuya Matsuura
  • Yasuo Bunai
  • Isao Ohya
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 284)

Abstract

A cytosolic NADP+-dependent dihydrodiol dehydrogenase (EC 1.3.1.20), that oxidizes dihydrodiol derivatives of benzene and naphthalene to the corresponding catechols, has been thought to play an important role in metabolic detoxification of carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (Oesch, et al., 1984) and in bioactivation of naphthalene in rabbit eye (van Heyningen, 1976). Dihydrodiol dehydrogenase was first isolated from rat liver (Vogel, et al., 1980) and has been subsequently identified as 3α-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (Penning, et al., 1984). The enzyme is a monomer of Mr35,000 and shows dehydrogenase activity for xenobiotic alicyclic alcohols and carbonyl reductase activity, which indicate that it also functions in carbonyl metabolism. Similar monomeric dihydrodiol dehydrogenases with broad substrate specificity for xenobiotics have been purified from other mammalian livers, and have been reported to be identical with 17ß-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase in the guinea pig (Hara, et al., 1986a), mouse (Sawada, et al., 1988) and rabbit (Hara, et al., 1986b), 3α(17β)-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases in the hamster (Ohmura, et al., 1990), 3(20)α-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase in the monkey (Hara, et al., 1989a), and aldehyde reductase.

Keywords

Aldose Reductase Monkey Kidney Hydroxysteroid Dehydrogenase Carbonyl Reductase Aldehyde Reductase 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Toshihiro Nakayama
    • 1
  • Hideo Sawada
    • 1
  • Yoshihiro Deyashiki
    • 1
  • Takushi Kanazu
    • 1
  • Akira Hara
    • 1
  • Michio Shinoda
    • 2
  • Kazuya Matsuura
    • 3
  • Yasuo Bunai
    • 3
  • Isao Ohya
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of BiochemistryGifu Pharmaceutical UniversityGifu 502Japan
  2. 2.Gihoku General HospitalGifu 501-21Japan
  3. 3.Department of Legal MedicineGifu University School of MedicineGifu 500Japan

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