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Metabolism of 4-Hydroxynonenal in Hepatoma Cell Lines

  • R. A. Canuto
  • G. Muzio
  • A. M. Bassi
  • M. E. Biocca
  • G. Poli
  • H. Esterbauer
  • M. Ferro
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 284)

Abstract

Peroxidation of membrane lipids is thought be a dynamic process which is ongoing in virtually all cells. Under normal conditions, cellular lipid peroxidation is well regulated and, as noted in a recent review (Esterbauer. et al. , 1990), is always associated with the formation of numerous and chemically diverse aldehydic products. Malondialdehyde (MDA) and trans-4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (HNE) are classified as major products of lipid peroxidation since they are present in the greatest quantities during peroxidation of cellular membrane lipids while trans-2-hexenal, acrolein and crotonaldehdye are representative of minor products of lipid peroxidation thought to be formed in significantly smaller quantities.

Keywords

Hepatoma Cell Alcohol Dehydrogenase Cytosolic Fraction Aldehyde Dehydrogenase Glutathione Transferase 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. A. Canuto
    • 1
  • G. Muzio
    • 1
  • A. M. Bassi
    • 2
  • M. E. Biocca
    • 1
  • G. Poli
    • 1
  • H. Esterbauer
    • 3
  • M. Ferro
    • 2
  1. 1.Dpt Experimental Medicine and OncologyUniversity of TurinTorinoItaly
  2. 2.University of Genoa (I)Italy
  3. 3.University of Graz(A)Austria

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