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Communication Tools for Human-Computer Knowledge Transfer

  • Jody Paul
Part of the Languages and Information Systems book series (LISS)

Abstract

Intelligent information systems, such as those built using knowledge-based system (KBS) technology, stress the human-computer interface in new ways. Such systems use knowledge as well as lower-level information. The application of KBS technology depends on two aspects of the communication of knowledge (knowledge transfer). First, it depends on the ability of humans to explicate their knowledge in ways that can be incorporated into the computer system. Second, it depends on the ability of the computer to divulge its knowledge to humans in a palatable and understandable form.

Keywords

Expert System User Model Conceptual Knowledge Rand Corporation Explanatory Information 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jody Paul
    • 1
  1. 1.Social Policy DepartmentThe Rand CorporationSanta MonicaUSA

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