Advertisement

Bone Marrow DNA Adducts and Bone Marrow Cellularity Following Treatment with Benzene Metabolites in Vivo

  • Christine C. Hedli
  • Robert Snyder
  • Charlotte M. Witmer
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 283)

Abstract

Benzenel (BZ) is a widely used industrial solvent, exposure to which has been linked to the development of aplastic anemia and leukemia. BZ is an animal carcinogen (Cronkite et al., 1984), but the ultimate carcinogenic metabolite still has not been determined. Recent work in our laboratory involving the mechanism of toxicity of BZ has been concerned with the capacity of BZ or its metabolites to interact with DNA. Previous studies have identified an adduct formed by the reaction of p-benzoquinone and deoxyguanosine in vitro (Jowa et al., 1986). Our current efforts have focused on the detection of adducts between BZ metabolites and DNA in vivo.

Keywords

Aplastic Anemia Adduct Formation Bone Marrow Cellularity Nucleate Bone Marrow Cell Robert Wood Johnson Medical School 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Cronkite, E.R., Bullis, J.E., Inoue, T. and Drew, R. (1984). Benzene inhalation produces leukemia in mice. Toxicol. Appl. Pharmacol. 75, 358.CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  2. Jowa, L., Winkle, S., Kalf, G.F., Witz, G., and Snyder, R. (1986). Deoxyguanosine adducts from benzoquinone and hydroquinone. In: Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology: Biological Intermediates III (J. Kocsis, D.J. Jollow, C.M. Witmer, J. 0. Nelson, and R. Snyder, Eds. ), Plenum Publishing, pp. 825–832.Google Scholar
  3. Reddy, M.V., Blackburn, G.R., Irwin, S.E.,Kommineni, C., Mackerer, C.R., and Mehlman, M.A. (1989). A method for in vitro culture of rat Zymbal gland:use in mechanistic studies of benzene carcinogenesis in combination with 32P-postlabeling. Environ. Health Perspect. 82, 239.Google Scholar
  4. Reddy, M.V., Blackburn, G.R., Schreiner, C.A., Mehlman, M.A. and Mackerer, C.R. (1989). 32P analysis of DNA adducts in tissues of benzene-treated rats.Environ. Health Perspect. 82, 253.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  5. Reddy, M.V., and Randerath, K. (1986). Nuclease Pl-mediated enhancement of sensitivity of 32P-postlabeling test for structurally diverse DNA adducts. Carcinogenesis 7, 1543.CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  6. Reddy, M.V., and Randerath, K. (1987). 32P analysis of DNA adducts in somatic and reproductive tissues of rats treated with the anticancer antibiotic, mitomycin C. Mutat. Res. 179, 75.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • Christine C. Hedli
    • 1
  • Robert Snyder
    • 1
  • Charlotte M. Witmer
    • 1
  1. 1.Joint Graduate Program in ToxicologyRutgers University/UMDNJ Robert Wood Johnson Medical SchoolPiscatawayUSA

Personalised recommendations