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Inhibition of Protein Synthesis and Secretion by Volatile Anesthetics in Guinea Pig Liver Slices

  • Hanan Ghantous
  • Jeannie Fernando
  • A. Jay Gandolfi
  • Klaus Brendel
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 283)

Abstract

The decrease in protein synthesis and secretion caused by volatile anesthetics was investigated using Hartley male guinea pig liver slices. Precision-cut liver slices (250–300 mM thick) were incubated in sealed roller vials (3 slices/vial) containing Krebs-Hensleit buffer at 37°C under 95% O2 atmosphere. Volatile anesthetics were injected through a teflon septa cap on a filter paper wick and vaporized to produce constant concentration in the medium. A concentration (1–2.1 mM) and time related (0–24) decrease in protein synthesis (3H-leucine incorporation) and secretion by halothane and d-halothane was observed. d-Halothane was less inhibiting than halothane. Inhibition was not on the uptake of the 3H-leucine but with its incorporation in the nascent peptide. The effects of enflurane (2.2 mM), isoflurane (2.2 mM), and sevoflurane (1.3 mM) on protein synthesis and secretion were also studied. The rank order of decrease in protein synthesis caused by the volatile anesthetics studied was halothane > isoflurane > enflurane > sevofluane > d-halothane. Enflurane, isoflurane, and sevoflurane increased the protein secretion while halothane and d-halothane caused a pronounced decrease. Alterations in protein synthesis and secretion appears to be an early and sensitive indicator of cytotoxin injury.

Keywords

Protein Synthesis Protein Secretion Volatile Anesthetic Liver Slice Nascent Peptide 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • Hanan Ghantous
    • 1
  • Jeannie Fernando
    • 1
  • A. Jay Gandolfi
    • 1
  • Klaus Brendel
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of AnesthesiologyUniversity of Arizona College of MedicineTucsonUSA

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