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The Metabolism of Benzene to Muconic Acid, a Potential Biological Marker of Benzene Exposure

  • G. Witz
  • T. A. Kirley
  • W. M. Maniara
  • V. J. Mylavarapu
  • B. D. Goldstein
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 283)

Abstract

Benzene, the simplest aromatic hydrocarbon, is a ubiquitous environmental pollutant. It is a volatile compound, extensively used in industry as an important synthetic intermediate. It is also an additive in gasoline. In addition to occupational exposure, a major human exposure results from cigarette smoke (Wallace, 1989). The toxicity of benzene as a leukemogen in humans (Goldstein, 1977) and a hematotoxic and carcinogenic agent in experimental animals (Snyder and Kocsis, 1977; Maltoni et al., 1989) has been well established. It is generally accepted that benzene toxicity is mediated by metabolites (Snyder et al., 1981). The nature of the metabolite(s) responsible for benzene toxicity is at present not known.

Keywords

Benzene Exposure Percent Dose Muconic Acid Mouse Liver Microsome Carboxylic Acid Functional Group 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • G. Witz
    • 1
  • T. A. Kirley
    • 1
  • W. M. Maniara
    • 1
  • V. J. Mylavarapu
    • 1
  • B. D. Goldstein
    • 1
  1. 1.Dept. of Environmental & Community Medicine and EOHSIUMDNJ-Robert Wood Johnson Medical SchoolPiscatawayUSA

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