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Comparing the Frequency and Spectra of Mutations Induced When an SV40-Based Shuttle Vector Containing Covalently Bound Residues of Structurally-Related Carcinogens Replicates in Human Cells

  • Veronica M. Maher
  • Jia-Ling Yang
  • M. Chia-Miao Mah
  • Yi-Ching Wang
  • Janet Boldt
  • J. Justin McCormick
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 283)

Abstract

It is widely recognized that the transformation of normal cells into malignant cells is a multistep process, and there is substantial evidence that mutations and gene rearrangements are involved in causing one or more of the required changes. However, the molecular mechanisms by which carcinogens induce such changes in mammalian cells are not well understood. One reason for this has been the difficulty involved in sequencing the newly mutated genes to determine the kinds of changes that have taken place. The recent development of shuttle vectors, i.e., small circular plasmid DNA molecules that are capable of replicating in mammalian cells and also in bacteria, has greatly reduced the level of difficulty (Calos et al.,1983; Sarkar et al., 1984; Seidman et al., 1985). It is now feasible to investigate at the DNA sequence level the nature of mutations formed when carcinogen-treated plasmids replicate in human cells.

Keywords

Base Substitution Shuttle Vector Bulky Adduct Chinese Hamster Ovary Cell Mutation Pyrene Diol 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • Veronica M. Maher
    • 1
  • Jia-Ling Yang
    • 1
  • M. Chia-Miao Mah
    • 1
  • Yi-Ching Wang
    • 1
  • Janet Boldt
    • 1
  • J. Justin McCormick
    • 1
  1. 1.Carcinogenesis Laboratory-Fee Hall Department of Microbiology and Department of BiochemistryMichigan State UniversityEast LansingUSA

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