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Measurement of Styrene-Oxide Cysteine Adducts in Hemoglobin by Selective Catalytic Reduction

  • David Ting
  • Martyn T. Smith
  • Penelope Doane-Setzer
  • Jeff Woodlee
  • S. M. Rappaport
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 283)

Abstract

Alkylating agents, either direct-acting or generated in vivo, form an important class of environmental mutagens and carcinogens. These agents are characterized by their ability to bind covalently to nucleophilic sites in proteins and DNA. Due to the long life time of red blood cells and the stability of protein adducts, Ehrenberg and coworkers first (Calleman 1978; Osterman-Golkar 1976) proposed the use of hemoglobin (Hb) as a dosimeter for alkylation in vivo.

Keywords

Selective Catalytic Reduction Styrene Oxide Raney Nickel Protein Adduct Glutathione Conjugate 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • David Ting
    • 1
  • Martyn T. Smith
    • 1
  • Penelope Doane-Setzer
    • 1
  • Jeff Woodlee
    • 1
  • S. M. Rappaport
    • 1
  1. 1.Dept. of Biomedical and Environmental Health Sciences School of Public HealthUniversity of CaliforniaBerkeleyUSA

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