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New Therapeutic Strategies in Parkinson’s Disease: Inhibition of MAO-B by Ro 19-6327 and of COMT by Ro 40-7592

  • M. Da Prada
  • G. Zürcher
  • R. Kettler
  • A. Colzi
Part of the Advances in Behavioral Biology book series (ABBI, volume 39)

Abstract

About three decades ago, it was observed for the first time that DOPA (levodopa, 3,4-dihydroxyphenyl-L-alanine) dramatically improved akinetic Parkinson’s patients1. Several direct acting dopamine (DA) D2 agonists were subsequently investigated but none proved to be sufficiently effective to be used routinely as the sole agent in the control of motor fluctuations in Parkinson’s disease (PD). Motor fluctuations also frequently complicate DOPA therapy and limit its therapeutic benefit. When used as adjuvants to DOPA, DA agonists may modestly diminish the fluctuations, but a relatively high incidence of side-effects, chiefly psychotoxic, has limited their use2. It is noteworthy that chronic treatment of PD with DOPA is devoid of neurotoxic effects and does not produce damage to the nigro-striatal dopaminergic neurones3. Therefore, treatment with DOPA in combination with peripheral L-amino acid decarboxylase (AADC) inhibitors will remain the standard pharmacological therapy for PD at least for the next decade. However, new strategies are being actively investigated and some have been proposed to ameliorate dyskinesias and motor fluctuations occurring in patients under therapy with DOPA combined with a peripheral AADC inhibitor, e.g. benserazide (Madopar®) or carbidopa (Sinemet®)2.

Keywords

Mean Arterial Blood Pressure Motor Fluctuation COMT Inhibitor COMT Activity Direct Acting Dopamine 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. Da Prada
    • 1
  • G. Zürcher
    • 1
  • R. Kettler
    • 1
  • A. Colzi
    • 1
  1. 1.Pharmaceutical Research DepartmentF. Hoffmann-La Roche LtdBaselSwitzerland

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