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Evidence for D2-Dopamine Receptors Modulating Noradrenaline Release in the Rat Frontal Cortex

  • Z. L. Rossetti
  • L. Pani
  • C. Portas
  • S. Carboni
  • G. L. Gessa
Part of the Advances in Behavioral Biology book series (ABBI, volume 39)

Abstract

The frontal cortex of the rat receives dopaminergic and noradrenergic nerve terminals from the ventral tegmental area and the locus coeruleus, respectively. Different categories of catecholamine receptors are present in this area, including alpha2-adrenoceptors and D1 and D2 dopamine (DA) receptors. However the location and the role of such receptors are not clear. Peripheral noradrenergic nerve terminals have both alpha2 and D2 presynaptic receptors, the stimulation of either ones resulting in the inhibition of noradrenaline (NA) release (see 1). In the central noradrenergic nerve terminals the presence of presynaptic alpha2-adrenoceptors has been shown in vitro by using brain slices and synaptosomes (2,3) and, more recently, by the use of the technique of brain dialysis in anesthetized rats (4). In the latter study the cortical outflow of NA was shown to be inhibited by clonidine, an alpha2-adrenoceptor agonist, and to be increased by idazoxan, a blocker of alpha2-adrenoceptors.

Keywords

Frontal Cortex Ventral Tegmental Area Locus Coeruleus Dopamine Autoreceptors Catecholamine Receptor 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • Z. L. Rossetti
    • 1
  • L. Pani
    • 1
  • C. Portas
    • 1
  • S. Carboni
    • 1
  • G. L. Gessa
    • 1
  1. 1.“B.B. Brodie” Department of NeuroscienceUniversity of CagliariCagliariItaly

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