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Striosomes and Matrisomes

  • A. M. Graybiel
  • A. W. Flaherty
  • J.-M. Giménez-Amaya
Part of the Advances in Behavioral Biology book series (ABBI, volume 39)

Abstract

In the past twelve years it has become clear that most neurotransmitter systems in the striatum are differentially distributed with respect to striosomes (“striatal bodies”) and their surrounding extrastriosomal matrix (Graybiel and Ragsdale, 1978, 1983; Herkenham and Pert, 1981; Gerfen, 1984; Gerfen et al., 1985a). The boundaries between striosomes and matrix govern the distributions of neurotransmitter-related compounds ranging from cholinergic and monoaminergic receptors and uptake sites to neuropeptides, benzodiazepine receptors, and calcium-binding proteins. The neurochemical differences between striosomes and matrix reflect differential distributions of striatal afferent fibers, interneurons and projection neurons in striosomes and matrix (see Graybiel, 1990 for review). The different neurochemistry, inputs, and outputs of striosomes and matrix all suggest that the two striatal compartments have different functional roles.

Keywords

Motor Cortex Somatosensory Cortex Globus Pallidus Projection Neuron Squirrel Monkey 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. M. Graybiel
    • 1
  • A. W. Flaherty
    • 1
  • J.-M. Giménez-Amaya
    • 2
  1. 1.Dept. of Brain and Cognitive SciencesMassachusetts Institute of TechnologyCambridgeUSA
  2. 2.Departamento de Morfología Facultad de MedicinaUniversidad Autónoma de MadridSpain

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