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Determination of DNA and Protein Structures in Solution via Complete Relaxation Matrix Analysis of 2D NOE Spectra

  • Thomas L. James
  • Brandan A. Borgias
  • Anna Maria Bianucci
  • Ning Zhou
Part of the Basic Life Sciences book series (BLSC, volume 56)

Abstract

A major objective of scientists for years has been the determination of molecular structures in non-crystalline environments. In general, researchers were forced to accept limited structural information due to the techniques available; certainly high-resolution structures such as those derived from x-ray diffraction (XRD) on crystals could not be remotely attained. However, recent developments provide us with the means to obtain considerable insight into solution structures (with resolution approaching, but not equaling, that of XRD on crystals).

Keywords

Internuclear Distance Spin Diffusion Distance Geometry Bovine Pancreatic Trypsin Inhibitor Interproton Distance 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Thomas L. James
    • 1
  • Brandan A. Borgias
    • 1
  • Anna Maria Bianucci
    • 2
  • Ning Zhou
    • 3
  1. 1.Departments of Pharmaceutical Chemistry and RadiologyUniversity of CaliforniaSan FranciscoUSA
  2. 2.Istituto di Chimica Farmaceutica e TossicologicaDell’Universita di PisaPisaItaly
  3. 3.Biological Sciences DepartmentUniversity of CalgaryCalgaryCanada

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