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Intent Inferencing with a Model-Based Operator’s Associate

  • Patricia M. Jones
  • Christine M. Mitchell
  • Kenneth S. Rubin

Abstract

This paper describes a portion of the OFMspert (Operator Function Model Expert System) research project. OFMspert is an architecture for an intelligent operator’s associate or assistant that can aid the human operator of a complex, dynamic system. Intelligent aiding requires both understanding and control. This paper focuses on the understanding (i.e., intent inferencing) ability of the operator’s associate. Understanding or intent inferencing requires a model of the human operator; the usefulness of an intelligent aid depends directly on the fidelity and completeness of its underlying model. The model chosen for this research is the operator function model (OFM) (Mitchell, 1987). The OFM represents operator functions, subfunctions, tasks, and actions as a heterarchic-hierarchic network of finite state automata, where the arcs in the network are system triggering events. The OFM provides the structure for intent inferencing in that operator functions and subfunctions correspond to likely operator goals and plans. A blackboard system similar to that of HASP (Nii et al., 1982) is proposed as the implementation of intent inferencing function. This system postulates operator intentions based on current system state and attempts to interpret observed operator actions in light of these hypothesized intentions.

The OFMspert system built for this research is tailored for the GT-MSOCC (Georgia Tech Multisatellite Operations Control Center) simulation. The GT-MSOCC OFMspert has been the subject of rigorous validation studies (Jones, 1988) that demonstrate its validity as an intent inferencer.

Keywords

Operator Action Knowledge Source Supervisory Control Complex Dynamic System Finite State Automaton 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Patricia M. Jones
    • 1
  • Christine M. Mitchell
    • 1
  • Kenneth S. Rubin
    • 2
  1. 1.Center for Human-Machine Systems Research School of Industrial and Systems EngineeringGeorgia Institute of TechnologyAtlantaUSA
  2. 2.ParcPlace SystemsPalo AltoUSA

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