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Dipole Magnet Development for the RHIC Accelerator

  • P. Wanderer
  • J. Cottingham
  • G. Ganetis
  • M. Garber
  • A. Ghosh
  • C. Goodzeit
  • A. Greene
  • R. Gupta
  • J. Herrera
  • S. Kahn
  • E. Kelly
  • G. Morgan
  • J. Muratore
  • A. Prodell
  • M. Rehak
  • E. P. Rohrer
  • W. Sampson
  • R. Shutt
  • P. Thompson
  • E. Willen
Part of the Ettore Majorana International Science Series book series (EMISS, volume 53)

Abstract

A Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider is presently in the design stage at Brookhaven National Laboratory in New York. It will collide beams of nuclei as heavy as gold, accelerated in two storage rings to energies between 7 and 100 GeV/u. The conventional facilities and injectors for the collider are largely in place. These include the 3.8 km long tunnel enclosure (built as part of the CBA project), four of the six planned experimental halls, a large control center building, a 25 kW helium refrigerator, and injection tunnels from the AGS. (The AGS is presently engaged in a fixed-target program of heavy ion experiments. A Booster synchrotron under construction will allow extending the mass of ion species from sulfur to gold.)

Keywords

Brookhaven National Laboratory Magnet Design Cold Mass Injection Tunnel Iron Yoke 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

  1. 1.
    P. Dahl et al., IEEE Trans. Magnetics 24, No. 2 (March 1988), p.723 summarizes earlier work on the RHIC dipoles.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Conceptual Design of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider,“ Brookhaven National Laboratory Report 52195, May 1989 (unpublished).Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    To obtain the geometric terms, measurements were made with both positive and negative dI/dt at 1.2 kA where saturation effects are negligible. Special runs were made at currents where the sextupole and decapole were small enough that feeddown effects to quadrupole and octupole harmonics could be neglected. The allowed harmonics have been corrected for differences between the design sizes and actual sizes of the shims between the pole and the coil.Google Scholar
  4. [4]
    J. Herrera et al., IEEE Trans. Nuclear Science, Vol. NS-32, No. 5 (October 1985), p. 3689.ADSCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. [5]
    C. L. Goodzeit at al., IEEE Trans. Magnetics 25, No. 2 (March 1989), p. 1463.ADSCrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • P. Wanderer
    • 1
  • J. Cottingham
    • 1
  • G. Ganetis
    • 1
  • M. Garber
    • 1
  • A. Ghosh
    • 1
  • C. Goodzeit
    • 1
  • A. Greene
    • 1
  • R. Gupta
    • 1
  • J. Herrera
    • 1
  • S. Kahn
    • 1
  • E. Kelly
    • 1
  • G. Morgan
    • 1
  • J. Muratore
    • 1
  • A. Prodell
    • 1
  • M. Rehak
    • 1
  • E. P. Rohrer
    • 1
  • W. Sampson
    • 1
  • R. Shutt
    • 1
  • P. Thompson
    • 1
  • E. Willen
    • 1
  1. 1.Brookhaven National LaboratoryUptonUSA

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