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A Possible Role for Glycoprotein gpV in the Pathogenesis of Varicella-Zoster Virus

  • Paul R. Kinchington
  • Paul Ling
  • Michael Pensiero
  • Ann Gershon
  • John Hay
  • William T. Ruyechan
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 278)

Abstract

Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) is one of the six known human herpesviruses. It is the causative agent of chicken pox (varicella) as the result of primary infection and shingles (zoster) upon reactivation from the latent state. A number of considerations make it clear that our knowledge of the natural history of this virus must be expanded. First, the increasing age of the general population in the United States is likely to lead to an increase in cases of recrudescent zoster with attendant morbidity. Second, both varicella and zoster can lead to systemic and potentially life-threatening infections in the immunocompromised. Third, a live attenuated VZV vaccine has been used extensively in Japan and is completing clinical trials in the United States (1).

Keywords

Vaccinia Virus Vaccine Strain Zoster Patient Vaccinia Virus Expression Human Convalescent Seron 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Paul R. Kinchington
    • 1
  • Paul Ling
    • 2
  • Michael Pensiero
    • 2
  • Ann Gershon
    • 3
  • John Hay
    • 2
  • William T. Ruyechan
    • 1
  1. 1.Departments of BiochemistryUniformed Services University of the Health SciencesBethesdaUSA
  2. 2.Departments of MicrobiologyUniformed Services University of the Health SciencesBethesdaUSA
  3. 3.Department of PediatricsCollege of Physicians and Surgeons of Columbia UniversityNew YorkUSA

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