Immunological Methods for the Detection of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon-DNA and Protein Adducts

  • Regina M. Santella
  • You Li
  • Yu Jing Zhang
  • Tie Lan Young
  • Marina Stefanidis
  • Xiao Qing Lu
  • Byung Mu Lee
  • Maria Gomes
  • Frederica P. Perera
Part of the Environmental Science Research book series (ESRH, volume 39)

Abstract

Sensitive immunological methods are now available for the detection and quantitation of carcinogen-DNA and protein adducts. Both monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies have been developed against DNA modified by benzo(a)pyrene diol epoxide-I (BPDE-I). These antisera recognize a number of structurally related diol epoxide-DNA adducts, and have been utilized in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) to determine adduct levels in DNA isolated from humans with several different environmental and occupational exposures to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Populations studied include cigarette smokers, foundry workers, coke oven workers, and coal tar treated psoriasis patients. Since these populations are exposed to complex mixtures of PAHs, multiple adducts will be formed and determined by the ELISA. In addition, the antibodies can be used in immunohistochemical studies to investigate localization of adducts to specific cell and tissue types.

Also methods recently have been developed for the immunological measurement of BPDE-I-protein adducts. For increased sensitivity, proteins are first enzymatically digested to peptides and amino acids before adduct quantitation by ELISA. This assay has been utilized to measure albumin adducts in roofers and controls. In a small number of subjects, no significant differences were seen between the two groups. Further studies are ongoing.

Keywords

Psoriasis Pyrene Asphalt Epoxide Diol 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Regina M. Santella
    • 1
  • You Li
    • 1
  • Yu Jing Zhang
    • 1
  • Tie Lan Young
    • 1
  • Marina Stefanidis
    • 1
  • Xiao Qing Lu
    • 1
  • Byung Mu Lee
    • 1
  • Maria Gomes
    • 1
  • Frederica P. Perera
    • 1
  1. 1.Cancer Center Division of Environmental ScienceColumbia University School of Public HealthNew YorkUSA

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