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Characterization of Mutagenic Compounds Formed During Disinfection of Drinking Water

  • Leif Kronberg
Part of the Environmental Science Research book series (ESRH, volume 39)

Abstract

The primary purpose for disinfection of drinking water is to destroy and eliminate pathogenic organisms responsible for waterborne diseases. Commonly used disinfectants are chlorine, chlorine dioxide, chloramine, and ozone. The most widely used disinfectant is chlorine. Chlorine has many advantages as it is toxic to many microorganisms, is cheaper than most other disinfectants, can be prepared in situ, and is not critically sensitive to pH and temperature variations (3). However, the very reactivity of chlorine produces problems. Especially harmful are the reactions with organic compounds present in water resulting in halogenated organics (4,14).

Keywords

Drinking Water Humic Acid Mutagenic Activity Chlorine Dioxide Water Disinfection 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Leif Kronberg
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Organic ChemistryThe University of Abo ÅkademiTurku/ÅboFinland

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