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The Role of Nitroarenes in the Mutagenicity of Airborne Particles Indoors and Outdoors

  • Hiroshi Tokiwa
  • Nobuyuki Sera
  • Mamiko Kai
  • Kazumi Horikawa
  • Yoshinari Ohnishi
Part of the Environmental Science Research book series (ESRH, volume 39)

Abstract

Nitroarenes are nitrated by-products of the reaction of various environmental agents with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs); the presence of nitroarenes in the environment appears to result mainly from manTs activities. Most nitroarenes are strongly associated with mutagenicity, genotoxicity, and carcinogenicity. Some nitroarenes, which are potent mutagens in bacteria, have been reported to be carcinogenic at various sites in animals [see review by Tokiwa and Ohnishi, (7)], suggesting a correlation between mutagenicity and carcinogenicity, at least in nitroarenes. However, there is no clear evidence that indicates an epidemiological relation with human carcinogenesis. On the other hand, it has been found that most nitroarenes are induced from diesel exhaust emissions, wood burning, kerosene heaters, city gas, and liquified petroleum gas, and are widespread in the environment (8). In relation to cigarette smoking, some nitroarenes were also found to be induced when cigarette smoke condensates were treated with nitric acid or Chinese cabbage pickles (4).

Keywords

High Performance Liquid Chromatography High Performance Liquid Chromatography Analysis Airborne Particulate Strain TA98 Cigarette Smoke Condensate 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Hiroshi Tokiwa
    • 1
  • Nobuyuki Sera
    • 1
  • Mamiko Kai
    • 1
  • Kazumi Horikawa
    • 1
  • Yoshinari Ohnishi
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Health ScienceFukuoka Environmental Research CenterFukuokaJapan
  2. 2.Department of Bacteriology School of MedicineThe University of TokushimaTokushimaJapan

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