Experimental and Epidemiologic Applications to Cancer Risk Assessment of Complex Mixtures

  • Marja Sorsa
  • Harri Vainio
  • Anthony J. McMichael
Part of the Environmental Science Research book series (ESRH, volume 39)

Abstract

Both the testing and the risk evaluation of human exposure to complex mixtures present difficult scientific problems. To better define the toxicity of complex mixtures, and thus to give a more precise and reliable risk assessment, there is a need for extensive experimental research as well as development of the risk assessment strategies. In the international workshop held in Espoo, Finland, in May 1989, the lines of exploration that are likely to yield the most relevant and practically useful information were discussed. The approaches for improved risk assessment include more effective use of epidemiology (including molecular epidemiology), health surveillance and biological monitoring (in vivo data on exposed humans), as well as in vivo toxicology studies supplemented with the relevant in vitro experiments and knowledge of chemistry.

Keywords

Toxicity Adduct Diesel Fractionation Gasoline 

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References

  1. 1.
    IARC monographs on the evaluation of carcinogenic risks to humans (1987) In Overall Evaluations of Carcinogenicity: An Updating of IARC Monographs Volumes 1 to 42, Suppl.7, pp. 1–440. International Agency for Research on Cancer, Lyon, France.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Vainio, H., M. Sorsa, and A.J. McMichael, eds. (1990) Complex mixtures and cancer risk. IARC Scient. Publ. (in press).Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Marja Sorsa
    • 1
  • Harri Vainio
    • 1
  • Anthony J. McMichael
    • 2
  1. 1.Institute of Occupational HealthHelsinkiFinland
  2. 2.Department of Community MedicineUniversity of AdelaideAdelaideAustralia

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