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Structure and Expression of mRNA for the Mouse Homolog of Alzheimer Amyloid Beta Protein Precursor

  • Takeshi Yamada
  • Ryutaro Izumi
  • Hiroyuki Sasaki
  • Hirokazu Furuya
  • Ikuo Goto
  • Yoshiyuki Sasaki
Part of the Advances in Behavioral Biology book series (ABBI, volume 38A)

Abstract

In the brain of patients with Alzheimer’s disease (AD), fibrillar amyloid is deposited as senile plaque core and cerebrovascular amyloidl(1,2). The beta protein or A4 protein is a major constituent of this amyloid and is now known to be the cleavage product of a larger precursor protein (BPP) which has features characteristic of glycosylated cell surface receptors(3). In human, at least three species of mRNA coding for the BPP of 695, 751 and 770-amino acid residues (hBPP695, hBPP751 and hBPP770) were found and the latter two were shown to encode a protease inhibitor domainl(4-6). The protease inhibitory activity could be related to aberrant BPP catabolism and eventually to amyloid fibril formation in AD.

Keywords

Beta Protein Northern Blot Hybridization Mouse Homolog Amyloid Beta Protein Beta Actin 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Takeshi Yamada
    • 1
    • 2
  • Ryutaro Izumi
    • 2
  • Hiroyuki Sasaki
    • 2
  • Hirokazu Furuya
    • 1
    • 2
  • Ikuo Goto
    • 1
  • Yoshiyuki Sasaki
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Neurology, Neurological Institute, Faculty of MedicineKyushu UniversityFukuoka 812Japan
  2. 2.Research Laboratory for Genetic InformationKyushu UniversityFukuoka 812Japan

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