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Topographical Distribution, Fine Structure of Component Fibrils, and Immunoreactivity of Neuronal Inclusions in Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, and Pick’s Diseases

  • Noriaki Yoshimura
  • Yutaka Fukushima
  • Muneo Matsunaga
  • Kazuo Takebe
  • Ihoko Yoshimura
  • Hajime Kudo
Part of the Advances in Behavioral Biology book series (ABBI, volume 38A)

Abstract

Neurofibrillary tangles(NFT’s), Pick bodies(PB’s), and Lewy bodies(LB’s) are filamentous neuronal inclusions that individually characterize different diseases. The distribution pattern, fine structure of the component fibrils, and immunoreactivity of these inclusions seem to share much in common with one another1–4. However, it has not been fully documented what similarity and dissimilarity can exist among them. It is not yet clear whether NFT’s in cases of Alzheimer’s dsease, Down’s syndrome, and myotonic dystrophy show an identical immunoreactivity. The purpose of this study was to elucidate these points.

Keywords

Neurofibrillary Tangle Sympathetic Ganglion Myotonic Dystrophy Pontine Nucleus Nucleus Dorsal Vagal 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Noriaki Yoshimura
    • 1
  • Yutaka Fukushima
    • 1
  • Muneo Matsunaga
    • 1
  • Kazuo Takebe
    • 1
  • Ihoko Yoshimura
    • 1
  • Hajime Kudo
    • 1
  1. 1.Departments of Pathology, Neuropsychiatry, Neurology, and Internal MedicineHirosaki University School of MedicineHirosakiJapan

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