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Dopa and Dopamine Cause the Destruction of Cultured Nerve Cells in the Presence of Iron: Possible Mechanism of the Nigral Degeneration in Parkinson’s Disease

  • Makoto Tanaka
  • Akemi Sotomatsu
  • Hiroko Kanai
  • Shunsaku Hirai
  • Minoru Nakano
Part of the Advances in Behavioral Biology book series (ABBI, volume 38A)

Abstract

Melanine-containing nerve cells in the brainstem are regularly and distinctively involved in Parkinson’s disease. Most prominent nerve cell loss is found in the substantia nigra, the most important dopaminergic center. The pathogenesis of this condition is still unknown in spite of extensive approaches from many aspects. All hypotheses for the nigral degeneration seem lacking in convincing evidences (Barbeau, 1984). On the other hand, biochemical analyses have revealed that the substantia nigra from parkinsonian subjects contains more ferric ion and lipid peroxide, and less polyunsaturated fatty acid than those from control subjects (Riederer et al., 1989; Dexter et al., 1989). These findings support the idea that melanine-containing nerve cells are destroyed by lipid peroxidation of the cell membrane, and that dopamine, its metabolically related compounds and iron take part in initiation of the pathologic process of the disorder.

Keywords

Lipid Peroxidation Nerve Cell Culture Nerve Cell Active Oxygen Species Nigral Degeneration 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Makoto Tanaka
    • 1
  • Akemi Sotomatsu
    • 1
  • Hiroko Kanai
    • 1
  • Shunsaku Hirai
    • 1
  • Minoru Nakano
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of NeurologySchool of MedicineShowa-machi, Maebashi 371Japan
  2. 2.College of Medical Care and TechnologyGunma UniversityMaebashi 371Japan

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