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Acute Effects of 1-Methyl-4-Phenyl-1,2,3,6-Tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) on Body Temperature of Various Strains of Mice

  • Takeshi Tadano
  • Nobunori Satoh
  • Katsuyuki Oyama
  • Kensuke Kisara
  • Yuichiro Arai
  • Hiroyasu Kinemuchi
Part of the Advances in Behavioral Biology book series (ABBI, volume 38A)

Abstract

Systemic administration of the neurotoxin MPTP to experimental animals induces the selective destruction of the nigrostriatal dopamine (DA) system. This MPTP-induced toxicity requires conversion of MPTP to its active metabolite, 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridine (MPP+), by the mitochondrial enzyme monoamine oxidase B-form (MAO-B).1 This selective MPTP neurotoxicity is accounted for by active MPP+ accumulation into DA neurons via the high affinity DA uptake system.1 The mitochondria, in addition to being the site for MPP+ formation, may also be an important target of MPP neurotoxicity, since MPP+ inhibits mitochondrial respiration, resulting in prevention of ATP formation with consequent cell death in the DA system. The MPTP-treated primates represent the best model currently available for study of the etiology of Parkinson’s disease.

Keywords

C57BL Mouse Hypothermic Effect MPTP Administration MPTP Injection Dopaminergic Neurotoxicity 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Takeshi Tadano
    • 1
  • Nobunori Satoh
    • 1
  • Katsuyuki Oyama
    • 1
  • Kensuke Kisara
    • 1
  • Yuichiro Arai
    • 2
  • Hiroyasu Kinemuchi
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of PharmacologyTohoku College of Pharmacy SendaiTokyoJapan
  2. 2.Department of PharmacologySchool of Medicine Showa UniversityTokyoJapan

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