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The Effects of N-Metyl-4-Phenyl-1,2,3,6-Tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) Administration to Maternal Mice on the Catecholamine System in the Brain of Postnatal Mice

  • Nobuhiko Ochi
  • Makoto Naoi
  • Makio Mogi
  • Yukihiro Ohya
  • Naoki Mizutani
  • Kazuyoshi Watanabe
  • Toshiharu Nagatsu
Part of the Advances in Behavioral Biology book series (ABBI, volume 38A)

Abstract

It is well-known that 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) induces a reduction in the number ofop aminergic neurons in the nigro-striatal system of primates and rodents.1–3 The molecular basis of the neurodegeneration by MPTP has been intensively studied and the toxicity was found to be asribed to its oxidative product, 1-methyl-4- phenylpyridinium ion (MPP+)4. The sensitivity of mice to MPTP is agedependent5; systemic administration of MPTP in young mature Bice could not induce a long-lasting reduction in the dopamine (DA) level. Recently in our laboratory, MPTP was found to be transported from the maternal mouse to the fetus through the placenta, for MPTP and MPP+ were detected in the brains of fetal mice.7 MPP+ was reported to destroy the dopaminergic cells cultured from the rat embryonic mesencephalon,8 but the in vivo effect of MPTP on animals in the fetal stage has never been reported.

Keywords

Tyrosine Hydroxylase Fetal Brain Postnatal Mouse Tyrosine Hydroxylase Activity MPTP Administration 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Nobuhiko Ochi
    • 1
  • Makoto Naoi
    • 2
  • Makio Mogi
    • 3
  • Yukihiro Ohya
    • 1
  • Naoki Mizutani
    • 1
  • Kazuyoshi Watanabe
    • 1
  • Toshiharu Nagatsu
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of PediatricsMatsumoto Dental CollegeShiojiriJapan
  2. 2.Department of Biochemistry Nagoya University School of MedicineMatsumoto Dental CollegeNagoyaJapan
  3. 3.Department of Oral BiochemistryMatsumoto Dental CollegeShiojiriJapan

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