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Blood-Brain Barrier Disturbance in Patients with Alzheimer’s Disease is Related to Vascular Factors

  • K. Blennow
  • A. Wallin
  • P. Fredman
  • I. Karlsson
  • C. G. Gottfries
  • L. Svennerholm
Part of the Advances in Behavioral Biology book series (ABBI, volume 38A)

Abstract

One of the theories of the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is that blood-brain barrier (BBB) dysfunction is the primary event (for review see 1,2). Also in aging, BBB dysfunction has been suggested (for review see 2). AD is associated with aging, i.e., it is more frequent in higher age. Many other diseases are in the same way associated with aging and thus expected to occur together with AD quite frequently. Some of these age-associated diseases, for instance hypertension, diabetes mellitus and various manifestations of arteriosclerosis have an important effect on the cerebral vasculature and the BBB function (2,3). Thus, when examining the BBB function in aging and AD, the coexistence of other diseases suspected of interfering with the BBB function should be taken ino account.

Keywords

Vascular Dementia Vascular Factor Albumin Ratio Visual Agnosia Barrier Disturbance 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • K. Blennow
    • 1
  • A. Wallin
    • 1
  • P. Fredman
    • 1
  • I. Karlsson
    • 1
  • C. G. Gottfries
    • 1
  • L. Svennerholm
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Psychiatry and NeurochemistryGothenburg University, St. Jörgens HospitalHisings BackaSweden

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