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Astroglial Gene Expression in the Hippocampus Following Partial Deafferentation in the Rat and in Alzheimer’s Disease

  • Judes Poirier
  • Mark Hess
  • Patrick C. May
  • Giulio Pasinetti
  • Caleb E. Finch
Part of the Advances in Behavioral Biology book series (ABBI, volume 38A)

Abstract

Astrocytes play important roles in the complex neuronal and glial response to brain injury and pathological neuronal loss. Also referred as gliosis, this process is usually characterized by extensive astroglial hypertrophy and proliferation. In addition, reactive astrocytes undergo numerous cytological, biochemical and histochemical changes, including accumulation of vimentin, glycogen, increased oxidoreductive enzyme activity and most notably, increased accumulation of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) (Bignami and Dahl, 1976). Reactive astrocytes appear to be involved in healing responses to neuron injury by scavenging myelin and neuronal debris (Lee et al., 1977) and by releasing soluble proteins in their microenvironment which often have neurotrophic properties.

Keywords

Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein Differential Expressi Reactive Astrocyte Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein Immunoreactivity Neurotrophic Property 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Judes Poirier
    • 1
  • Mark Hess
    • 2
  • Patrick C. May
    • 2
  • Giulio Pasinetti
    • 2
  • Caleb E. Finch
    • 2
  1. 1.McGill Center For studies In AgingMontreal General HospitalMontrealCanada
  2. 2.Andrus Gerontology CenterUniversity of Southern CaliforniaLos AngelesUSA

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