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Regional Phospholipid Profile of Alzheimer’s Brain

31P and proton NMR spectroscopic studies of membrane lipid extracts
  • Tsutomu Nakada
  • Ingrid L. Kwee
  • Nobuyuki Suzuki
  • William G. Ellis
Part of the Advances in Behavioral Biology book series (ABBI, volume 38A)

Abstract

The phospholipids constitute the major component of brain lipids accounting for greater than 60% of total brain lipids. Most of the brain phospholipids are associated with the membrane system (1,2). Phosphatidylcholine (PC), phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), phosphatidylserine (PS), phosphatidylinositol (PI), sphingomyelin (SM), and ethanolamine plasmalogen (EP) are the six main brain membrane phospholipids. The relative ratio of these six phospholipids (phospholipid profile) is known to exhibit regional specificity (1-4). Gray matter is especially rich in PC, while in white matter the proportion of PE is increased. While PS and PI are distributed throughout the brain in relatively even proportions, SM and EP reflect myelin rich structures. The phospholipid profile of the various regions of the brain are remarkably consistent and alterations in the profile reflect abnormalities in the membrane system. In this study, we investigated regional membrane phospholipid profiles of four major cortical areas (frontal, parietal, temporal, and occipital) in four cases of autopsy proven Alzheimer’s disease using phosphorus-31 (31P) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and acidified lipid extraction of brains (3). Proton NMR spectroscopy was also performed to investigate the relative levels of unsaturated fatty acids.

Keywords

Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Tube Brain Phospholipid Proton Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Tsutomu Nakada
    • 1
    • 2
  • Ingrid L. Kwee
    • 1
    • 1
  • Nobuyuki Suzuki
    • 1
    • 2
  • William G. Ellis
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  1. 1.Neurochemistry Research LaboratoryDepartment of Veteran Affairs Medical CenterMartinezUSA
  2. 2.Departments of NeurologyUniversity of CaliforniaDavisUSA
  3. 3.PathologyUniversity of CaliforniaDavisUSA

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