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Phosphorylation of Tau Protein with a Novel Tau Protein Kinase Forming Paired Helical Filament Epitopes on Tau

  • Koichi Ishiguro
  • Kazuki Sato
  • Akira Omori
  • Kayoko Tomizawa
  • Tsuneko Uchida
  • Kazutomo Imahori
Part of the Advances in Behavioral Biology book series (ABBI, volume 38A)

Abstract

In aged human brain and particularly in Alzheimer’s disease brain, paired helical filaments (PHF’s) accumulate in the neuronal cells. Recently, it was discovered that tau protein is a component of PHF. Tau protein is one of the brain-specific, microtubule-associated proteins (MAP’s) and promotes the formation of microtubules in vitro and in vivo. Several groups found using antibodies that the tau in PHF is highly phosphorylated. Y. Ihara et al.1 showed that anti PHF polyclonal antibodies contain an antibody reacting with phosphorylated tau (p-tau) but not with dephosphorylated tau (dp-tau). Grundke-Iqbal et al.2 reported that monoclonal antibody to tau, tau-1, reacted with PHF, and reacted even more strongly with dephosphorylated PHF. Normally, tau is associated with microtubules and easily solubilized. However, tau in PHF is unusually insoluble, thus giving rise to the following question: how is tau incorporated into PHF to become an insoluble form? We assume that the phosphorylation of tau is the cause of PHF formation. To study the mechanism underlying accumulation of PHF’s, we purified and characterized a novel protein kinase that phosphorylates tau protein to form PHF epitopes, and studied properties of tau phosphorylated by the kinase.

Keywords

Phosphorylation Site Brain Extract Paired Helical Filament Microtubule Formation Aged Human Brain 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Koichi Ishiguro
    • 1
  • Kazuki Sato
    • 1
  • Akira Omori
    • 1
  • Kayoko Tomizawa
    • 1
  • Tsuneko Uchida
    • 1
  • Kazutomo Imahori
    • 1
  1. 1.Mitsubishi Kasei Institute of Life SciencesMachida-shi, Tokyo 194Japan

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