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Cystatin C (γ-Trace) and β-Protein Coexist in the Cerebral Amyloid Angiopathy Causing Cerebral Hemorrhage and Consequential Vascular Dementia

  • Shigeyoshi Fujihara
  • Koichi Shimode
  • Morihiko Nakamura
  • Shotai Kobayashi
  • Tokugoro Tsunematsu
  • Astridur Palsdottir
  • Leifur Thorsteinsson
  • Olafur Jensson
Part of the Advances in Behavioral Biology book series (ABBI, volume 38A)

Abstract

Cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) is one of the important pathological changes of Alzheimer’s disease.1 CAA also causes unique cerebral hemorrhages. In typical cases, recurrent, multiple and lobar hemorrhages occur in normotensive elderly people and cause consequential dementia of the vascular type.2 As for the protein nature of the amyloid of CAA, there are at least two types of amyloid. One is β-protein (BP) and the other is variant cystatin C (CC). The former is found in CAA and in senile plaques of Alzheimer’s Disease(AD).3,4 CAA amyloid of normal elderly is also BP.5 On the other hand, variant CC is the main component of CAA amyloid of hereditary cerebral hemorrhage with amyloidosis (HCHWA) found in Iceland.6 Recently, we reported Japanese cases of CAA causin cerebral hemorrhage, of which amyloid shows the antigenicity of CC.7,8 Two of them had a family history of possible CAA and the others were sporadic.8 To characterize the Japanese cases of CAA with the deposition of CC and to compare them with Icelandic cases, we used the immunoperoxidase method in combination with anti-BP, conducted biochemical analyses, and studied the DNA of the CC gene.

Keywords

Vascular Dementia Senile Plaque Cerebral Hemorrhage Amyloid Fibril Cerebral Amyloid Angiopathy 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Shigeyoshi Fujihara
    • 1
  • Koichi Shimode
    • 1
  • Morihiko Nakamura
    • 1
  • Shotai Kobayashi
    • 1
  • Tokugoro Tsunematsu
    • 1
  • Astridur Palsdottir
    • 2
  • Leifur Thorsteinsson
    • 2
  • Olafur Jensson
    • 2
  1. 1.Third Division of Internal MedicineShimane Medical UniversityIzumoJapan
  2. 2.Blood Bank, National HospitalUniversity of IcelandReykjavikIceland

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