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Investigation of MHC Antigens on Neural Graft in Mouse Parkinson’s Models

  • Keiji Shimizu
  • Masanobu Yamada
  • Yutaka Matsui
  • Kazuyoshi Tamura
  • Syusuke Moriuchi
  • Heitaro Mogami
Part of the Advances in Behavioral Biology book series (ABBI, volume 38A)

Abstract

Parkinson’s disease is one of the most common disorders that affect the nigrostriatal system in human. Loss of neurons in the substantia nigra and severe depletion of dopamine (DA) in the corpus striatum are the hallmarks of this condition. The most effective treatment of Parkinson’s disease, particularly in its early phase, is the administration of both the L-isomer of 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA) and dopamine-receptor agonists. However, it is clear that L-DOPA and the receptor agonists provide only limited ameliorable treatment and that most patients inexorably become progressively debilitated regardless of the type of therapy. On the other hand, an alternative approach in the therapeutic management of Parkinson’s disease is surgical implantation of either DA neurons or adrenal chromaffin cells that have the ability to release DA.1

Keywords

Tyrosine Hydroxylase Adrenal Chromaffin Cell Ventral Mesencephalon Neural Transplantation Ipsilateral Striatum 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Keiji Shimizu
    • 1
  • Masanobu Yamada
    • 1
  • Yutaka Matsui
    • 1
  • Kazuyoshi Tamura
    • 1
  • Syusuke Moriuchi
    • 1
  • Heitaro Mogami
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of NeurosurgeryOsaka University Medical SchoolOsaka 553Japan

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