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Autotransplantation of Sympathetic Ganglion into the Brain of Parkinsonian Monkey

  • Toru Itakura
  • Mitsukazu Nakai
  • Norihiko Komai
Part of the Advances in Behavioral Biology book series (ABBI, volume 38A)

Abstract

Recent biochemical and histochemical studies have evidenced that Parkinson’s disease results from the loss of dopamine neurons in the substantia nigra. To counteract the dopamine deficiency in the brain, L-dopa is usually administered to patients with Parkinson’s disease. However, problems such as “on-off” and “wearing-off” phenomena, or dyskinesia have occurred in patients with long-term administration of L-dopa.1 As a possible future substitute for L-dopa treatment, we have investigated the effect of transplantation of autologous superior cervical ganglion (SCG) into the brains of monkey in which parkinsonism was induced by 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1, 2, 5, 6 — tetrahydropyridine (MPTP). We used the SCG as a donor tissue, because this ganglion contains not only norepinephrine neurons but also dopaminergic ones.2

Keywords

Dopamine Neuron Superior Cervical Ganglion Glyoxylic Acid MPTP Treatment Striatal Cell 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Toru Itakura
    • 1
  • Mitsukazu Nakai
    • 1
  • Norihiko Komai
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Neurological SurgeryWakayama Medical CollegeWakayamaJapan

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