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Impaired Spatial Learning in Rats with a Trimethyltin-Induced Hippocampal Lesion and the Effect of Fetal Septal Grafting on the Impairment

  • Nobumasa Kato
  • Masashi Akaike
  • Akira Masui
Part of the Advances in Behavioral Biology book series (ABBI, volume 38A)

Abstract

Trimethyltin (TMT), an organotin compound, is a by-product in the manufacture of dimethyltin chloride, a stabilizing agent for certain plastics. Exposure to TMT causes neuopathological changes in the limbic system of the brain (Brown et al.,1979; Bouldin et al., 1981). An accidental exposure to TMT in humans has been reported to induce a status of mental confusion with generalized epileptic seizures (Fortemps et al., 1987). Among the regions of the central nervous system in rats, the hippocampus subsequently became the focus of research in TMT neuotoxicity. The pyramidal cells of the CA3 and CA4 hippocampal subfields appear to be particularly sensitive to acute toxicity with a single dose of TMT (Dyer et al., 1982). The long-term behavioral sequelae of TMT intoxication have revealed marked hyperactivity and learning impairments (Hagan et al., 1990).

Keywords

Spatial Learning Passive Avoidance Hippocampal Lesion Organotin Compound Pyramidal Cell Layer 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Nobumasa Kato
    • 1
  • Masashi Akaike
    • 2
  • Akira Masui
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychiatryShiga University of Medical ScienceOtsu 520-21Japan
  2. 2.Pharma Research LaboratoriesHoechst Japan Ltd.Minamidai, Kawagoe 350Japan

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