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Examination of Central Nervous System Effects of Amphetamine Using NEUBA®

  • Hirohisa Satoh
  • Konosuke Kumakura
  • R. Brent Miller
  • D. J. Turk
  • Sherrel Howard
  • Yuji Maruyama
  • C. LeRoy Blank
Part of the Advances in Behavioral Biology book series (ABBI, volume 38A)

Abstract

A brief review of the literature indicates that d-(+)-amphetamine is one of the most heavily investigated CNS stimulants (Kuczenski, 1983). The mode of action of this compound is inevitably connected to, at least, catecholaminergic pathways. The well-known behavioral actions of amphetamine, including locomotor stimulation and stereopathy, can be readily blocked by surgical removal or pharmacological blockade of specific catecholaminergic pathways in the CNS. On the other hand, the involvement of alternative neurotransmitter pathways in the expression of amphetamine psychostimulant effects is relatively less well investigated.

Keywords

Central Nervous System Stimulant Amphetamine Treatment Dopa Accumulation Dopa Decarboxylase Inhibitor Neostriatal Neuron 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Hirohisa Satoh
    • 1
  • Konosuke Kumakura
    • 1
  • R. Brent Miller
    • 2
  • D. J. Turk
    • 2
  • Sherrel Howard
    • 3
  • Yuji Maruyama
    • 4
  • C. LeRoy Blank
    • 2
  1. 1.Life Science InstituteSophia UniversityTokyoJapan
  2. 2.Department of Chemistry and BiochemistryOklahoma UniversityNormanUSA
  3. 3.Department of PharmacologyUCLALos AngelesUSA
  4. 4.Department of NeuropsychopharmacologyGunma University, School of MedicineMaebashiJapan

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