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Electrical Properties of the Basolateral Membrane of Hair Cells — A Review

  • C. J. Kros
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (NSSA, volume 194)

Abstract

Hair cells, as found in the lateral line, vestibular and auditory systems of all classes of vertebrates, share a number of obvious similarities. All of them are situated in a modified epithelium separating two very different extracellular fluids: perilymph, surrounding the basolateral part of the cells and endolymph, in contact with the apical part of the cells from which the stereociliary bundle, the mechanoreceptive element of the hair cell, projects. Sodium is the major cation in the perilymph, as in most extracellular fluids elsewhere in the body; potassium is the major cation in the endolymph. The fluids are separated by tight junctions between the cells of this modified epithelium.

Keywords

Hair Cell Outer Hair Cell Corner Frequency Potassium Conductance Auditory Nerve Fibre 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • C. J. Kros
    • 1
  1. 1.The Physiological LaboratoryCambridgeUK

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