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Ultrastructural Events Associated with Endothelial Cell Changes During the Initiation and Early Progression of Atherosclerosis

  • Richard G. Taylor
  • W. Gray Jerome
  • Jon C. Lewis
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 273)

Abstract

Vascular endothelial cells maintain homeostasis by anti-adhesive and anti-fibrinolytic properties. Endothelial cell dysfunction is associated with the pathogenesis of disease processes such as inflammation and atherosclerosis. The study of endothelial cell function in the initiation and progression of atherosclerosis has focussed upon endothelial cell injury. It is now recognized that endothelium is altered by many means, including flow perturbations, hypercholesterolemia, endotoxin or immune complexes (Engelberg, 1989); and that a nondenuding injury, or dysfunction (Reidy, 1985) is likely to be associated with atherogenesis.

Keywords

Endothelial Cell Endothelial Cell Proliferation Monocyte Adhesion Cholesterol Feeding Macrophage Foam Cell 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Richard G. Taylor
    • 1
  • W. Gray Jerome
    • 1
  • Jon C. Lewis
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PathologyBowman Gray School of Medicine of Wake Forest UniversityWinston-SalemUSA

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