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Cigarette Smoking and Coronary Artery Disease

  • Graham A. Colditz
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 273)

Abstract

As many speakers have reviewed during this conference, the pathogenesis of coronary heart disease, which includes the clinical manifestations of myo-cardial infarction, angina pectoris, and sudden death, is extremely complex and mediated by multiple mechanisms and etiologic factors (1). At least five interrelated processes are likely to contribute to the clinical manifestations of myocardial infarction: atherosclerosis, thrombosis, coronary artery spasm, cardiac arrythmia, and reduced capacity of the blood to deliver oxygen.

Keywords

Coronary Heart Disease Cigarette Smoking Smoking Cessation Surgeon General Nonfatal Myocardial Infarction 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Graham A. Colditz
    • 1
  1. 1.Channing Laboratory, Department of MedicineHarvard Medical School and Brigham and Women’s HospitalBostonUSA

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