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Acute Platelet Activation Induced by Smoking Cigarettes: In Vivo and Ex Vivo Studies in Humans

  • Kai G. Schmidt
  • Jens W. Rasmussen
  • Vagn Bonnevie-Nielsen
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 273)

Abstract

The epidemiological and pathological evidence for a relationship between cigarette smoking and atherosclerosis is considerable (1). In particular, a strong correlation between cigarette smoking and acute cardiac events in those with an already compromised coronary circulation is evident (2). As platelets seem to play a central role for the development of atherosclerosis and its thromboembolic complications (3), it is natural that a vivid interest has been taken in the effects of cigarette smoking on platelet function.

Keywords

Platelet Activation Platelet Function Autologous Platelet Acute Cardiac Event Splenic Blood Flow 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kai G. Schmidt
    • 1
  • Jens W. Rasmussen
    • 1
  • Vagn Bonnevie-Nielsen
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Nuclear Medicine and Department of Clinical ChemistryOdense University HospitalDenmark

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