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Reproductive Disorders in Female SHR Rats Infected with Sialodacryoadenitis Virus

  • Kenjiro Utsumi
  • Yutaka Yokota
  • Takashi Ishikawa
  • Kunio Ohnishi
  • Kosaku Fujiwara
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 276)

Abstract

Effects of sialodacryoadenitis virus infection on the reproduction of female SHR rats were studied. The oestrous cycle was considerably perturbed in most infected rats, the perturbation was observed initially between Days 0 to 10 post infection and the effect persisted for 6 to 18 days. About half of the foetuses of dams infected on Day 0 of gestation were found dead while only 4% of the foetuses from non-infected dams were found dead. Five or six days after infection on Day 0 of gestation, some infected dams were shown to have metritis, and virus antigen was detectable within the endometrium as well as exudate cells. In dams infected on Day 5 or later of gestation and severely diseased, the offspring showed a low survival rate possibly because of inadequate nursing.

Keywords

Infectious Bronchitis Virus Oestrous Cycle Mouse Hepatitis Virus Embryonic Death Pregnant Uterus 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kenjiro Utsumi
    • 1
  • Yutaka Yokota
    • 1
  • Takashi Ishikawa
    • 1
  • Kunio Ohnishi
    • 1
  • Kosaku Fujiwara
    • 2
  1. 1.Research LaboratoriesDainippon Pharmaceutical Ltd.SuitaJapan
  2. 2.Nihon University School of Veterinary MedicineFujisawaJapan

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