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Location of Antigenic Sites of the S-Glycoprotein of Transmissible Gastroenteritis Virus and their Conservation in Coronaviruses

  • L. Enjuanes
  • F. Gebauer
  • I. Correa
  • M. J. Bullido
  • C. Suñé
  • C. Smerdou
  • C. Sánchez
  • J. A. Lenstra
  • W. P. A. Posthumus
  • R. H. Meloen
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 276)

Abstract

Transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV) has a single-stranded, positive-sense RNA genome of more than 20 kb (Brian et al., 1980; Rasschaert et al., 1987) and three structural proteins: S, N and M, with 1447, 382 and 262 amino acids, respectively (Kapke and Brian, 1986; Laude et al., 1987; Rasschaert and Laude, 1987; Jacobs et al., 1987).

Keywords

Porcine Epidemic Diarrhea Virus Antigenic Site Mouse Hepatitis Virus Antigenic Homology Transmissible Gastroenteritis Virus 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • L. Enjuanes
    • 1
  • F. Gebauer
    • 1
  • I. Correa
    • 1
  • M. J. Bullido
    • 1
  • C. Suñé
    • 1
  • C. Smerdou
    • 1
  • C. Sánchez
    • 1
  • J. A. Lenstra
    • 2
  • W. P. A. Posthumus
    • 3
  • R. H. Meloen
    • 3
  1. 1.Centro de Biología Molecular CSIC-UAM, Facultad de CienciasUniversidad Autónoma Canto BlancoMadridSpain
  2. 2.Institute of Infectious Diseases and Immunology Veterinary FacultyState UniversityUtrechtThe Netherlands
  3. 3.Central Veterinary InstituteLelystadThe Netherlands

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