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American Vernacular Architecture

  • Thomas C. Hubka
Part of the Advances in Environment, Behavior, and Design book series (AEBD, volume 3)

Abstract

A chapter for an “advances” volume could begin with a brief outline of the subject before examining the leading, cutting-edge works. The scope of American vernacular architectural studies, however, needs consider able explanation, because the range of topics now considered “vernacular” has changed in the last 10 years, causing much restructuring in the field. The idea of a succinct or unified subject has been strained by the inclusion of large unwieldy new areas such as multiunit and mass-produced housing, commercial and industrial architecture, and urban structures of all periods and types (see Figures 1–3). These new areas promise to challenge the central themes and the existing agenda within this loosely organized discipline. Consequently, defining the scope of American vernacular architecture studies takes on greater importance for developing an idea of “advances” for this domain of inquiry.

Keywords

Architectural Scholarship Vernacular Architecture Architecture Study Building Scholar Humanistic Discipline 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • Thomas C. Hubka
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of ArchitectureUniversity of Wisconsin-MilwaukeeMilwaukeeUSA

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