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Lymphokine-Activated Killer (LAK) Cell Activity in Psychiatric Illness

  • Ziad A. Kronfol
  • Madhavan P. N. Nair
  • Kavita Goel
  • Joann Goodson
  • Stanley A. Schwartz

Abstract

There is now a great deal of evidence that the central nervous system and the immune system are closely interrelated (Ader, 1981). Messengers from the brain are now known to affect immune regulation. Similarly, secretory products of immune cells and tissues can affect brain function. A number of investigators have recently studied the integrity of the immune response in patients with psychiatric disorders. Several immune abnormalities were identified in patients with major depression. These include lymphocytopenia (Kronfol et al., 1984), reduction in circulating T cell numbers (Schleifer et al.,1984), impairment in mitogen-induced lymphocyte proliferation (Kronfol et al., 1983), and a decrease in natural killer (NK) cell activity (Kronfol et al., 1989). Similarly, abnormalities in immune regulation in schizophrenia have also been reported. These include an increase in the number of B lymphocytes, a decrease in NK cell activity, and an increase in the level of specific immunoglobuslins and/or specific antibrain antibodies (DeLisi, 1984).

Keywords

Natural Killer Schizophrenic Patient Psychiatric Illness Psychiatric Patient Immune Regulation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ziad A. Kronfol
    • 1
  • Madhavan P. N. Nair
    • 2
  • Kavita Goel
    • 1
  • Joann Goodson
    • 1
  • Stanley A. Schwartz
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of PsychiatryUniversity of Michigan Medical CenterAnn ArborUSA
  2. 2.Department of Psychiatry, Pediatrics, and EpidemiologyUniversity of Michigan Medical CenterAnn ArborUSA
  3. 3.Department of Pediatrics and EpidemiologyUniversity of Michigan Medical CenterAnn ArborUSA

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