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Bioassessment Methods for Determining the Hazards of Dredged Material Disposal in the Marine Environment

  • J. H. Gentile
  • G. G. Pesch
  • K. J. Scott
  • W. Nelson
  • W. R. Munns
  • J. M. Capuzzo
Part of the Environmental Science Research book series (ESRH, volume 38)

Abstract

Approximately 325 million m3 of sediment are dredged annually for navigation purposes in the United States. Of this, 46 million m3 are disposed of annually in the ocean (Peddicord, 1987). Decisions regarding the ocean disposal of dredged material result, in large part, from bioassessment-based estimates of contaminant exposure and ecological impacts (U.S. EPA/COE, 1977). Predictions of impacts for an individual dredging project are estimated from laboratory determinations of the magnitude, bioavailability, bioaccumulation, and hazards (toxicity) of dredged material contaminants. Disposal site management of individual and multiple dredging projects requires monitoring for contaminant transport, availability and accumulation in biota, and the hazards to ecologically and commercially important populations. Because of their importance, suites of bioassessment methods representing several levels of biological organization have been proposed for predicting and assessing the hazards resulting from the ocean disposal of dredged material (Gentile and Scott, 1987; Gentile et al, 1988c).

Keywords

Disposal Site Mytilus Edulis Sister Chromatid Exchange Somatic Growth Shell Growth 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. H. Gentile
    • 1
  • G. G. Pesch
    • 2
  • K. J. Scott
    • 3
  • W. Nelson
    • 2
  • W. R. Munns
    • 3
  • J. M. Capuzzo
    • 1
  1. 1.Woods Hole Oceanographic InstitutionWoods HoleUSA
  2. 2.Environmental Protection AgencyNarragansettUSA
  3. 3.Science Applications International CorporationNarragansettUSA

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