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Chemical Etiology of Endemic Diseases: A Global Perspective

  • P. J. Peterson
Part of the Environmental Science Research book series (ESRH, volume 38)

Abstract

Human health, especially of rural populations in developing countries, is still directly influenced by the environment, whether from vector-borne diseases or from the geochemical abundance or deficiency of elements. With the exception of specific minority groups, usually those with unusual dietary habits, populations in the developed world are no longer markedly affected by such factors. Nevertheless, in global terms, as the majority of peoples live in rural surroundings, the environmental influence is all-important. In recent years vector-borne disease and diarrheal-type diseases, especially in children, have assumed prominence while nutritionally related diseases are often neglected.

Keywords

Dental Fluorosis Endemic Goitre Skeletal Fluorosis Purplish Soil Keshan Disease 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • P. J. Peterson
    • 1
  1. 1.Monitoring and Assessment Research CentreLondonUK

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