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Biological Markers in Animal Sentinels: Laboratory Studies Improve Interpretation of Field Data

  • John F. McCarthy
  • Braulio D. Jimenez
  • Lee R. Shugart
  • Frederick V. Sloop
  • Aimo Oikari
Part of the Environmental Science Research book series (ESRH, volume 38)

Abstract

A number of approaches have been used to evaluate the biological hazards of environmental pollution. Chemical analysis of the concentrations of toxic compounds in environmental media is clearly an important component of such an evaluation. Advanced analytical procedures are specific, quantitative, and exquisitely sensitive and precise. However, the biological significance of the chemical concentrations is not at all clear. We understand the toxic action of but a few of the thousands of chemicals in the environment and have almost no information on the toxicity of complex mixtures of chemicals. Furthermore, a chemical survey is a snapshot in time and space. Variations in concentrations over time resulting from intermittent releases of effluents by industries or from storm events, changes in winds, etc., cannot be accounted for without repeated analyses. Spatial patchiness of contaminant patterns also requires extensive and expensive sampling and chemical analyses.

Keywords

Generator Column EROD Activity Reference Stream Bluegill Sunfish East Fork Poplar Creek 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • John F. McCarthy
    • 1
  • Braulio D. Jimenez
    • 1
  • Lee R. Shugart
    • 1
  • Frederick V. Sloop
    • 1
  • Aimo Oikari
    • 2
  1. 1.Environmental Sciences DivisionOak Ridge National LaboratoryOak RidgeUSA
  2. 2.University of JoensuuJoensuuFinland

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