Clinical Considerations for Neutron Capture Therapy of Brain Tumors

  • H. Madoc-Jones
  • D. E. Wazer
  • R. G. Zamenhof
  • O. K. Harling
  • J. A. BernardJr.
Part of the Basic Life Sciences book series (BLSC, volume 54)

Abstract

In welcoming this Workshop on Neutron Capture Therapy to Boston, it would be appropriate to reflect upon the fact that, at the turn of the century, Boston was a major center for the development and use of x-rays to cure cancer. This was summarized by Dr. Francis H. Williams in his book entitled, “The Roentgen Rays in Medicine and Surgery as an Aid in Diagnosis and as a Therapeutic Agent,” published in 1901. Dr. Williams published some of the first photographs documenting the curative potential of the then newly discovered x-rays for the treatment of skin cancers. In the ensuing decades, the science and technology of ionizing radiation has been developed and expanded to effectively treat a wide variety of tumors. For many, radiation therapy as a primary or adjuvant treatment either leads to cure of their disease or is a highly effective means of palliation. However, the results of even modern radiotherapy for the management of primary brain tumors and tumor metastases to the brain from primaries arising elsewhere in the body have been extremely disappointing. In spite of significant advances in our understanding of tumor biology and technical advances in radiation delivery, the results of radiotherapy for these tumors have not changed significantly during the past twenty years. We are, therefore, very excited at the potential clinical impact of neutron capture therapy (NCT).

Keywords

Lymphoma Adenocarcinoma Boron Fractionation Myeloma 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • H. Madoc-Jones
    • 1
  • D. E. Wazer
    • 1
  • R. G. Zamenhof
    • 1
  • O. K. Harling
    • 2
  • J. A. BernardJr.
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Radiation OncologyTufts — New England Medical CenterBostonUSA
  2. 2.Nuclear Reactor LaboratoryMassachusetts Institute of TechnologyCambridgeUSA

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